Climategate

"Carbon (Dioxide) trading is now the fastest growing commodities market on earth.....And here’s the great thing about it. Unlike traditional commodities markets, which will eventually involve delivery to someone in physical form, the carbon (dioxide) market is based on lack of delivery of an invisible substance to no-one. Since the market revolves around creating carbon (dioxide) credits, or finding carbon (dioxide) reduction projects whose benefits can then be sold to those with a surplus of emissions, it is entirely intangible." (Telegraph)

This blog has been tracking the 'Global Warming Scam' for over five years now. There are a very large number of articles being published in blogs and more in the MSM who are waking up to the fact the public refuse to be conned any more and are objecting to the 'green madness' of governments and the artificially high price of energy. This blog will now be concentrating on the major stories as we move to the pragmatic view of 'not if, but when' and how the situation is managed back to reality. To quote Professor Lindzen, "a lot of people are going to look pretty silly"


PS: If you have arrived here on a page link, then click on the HOME link...

Saturday, 9 February 2013

Nemo: Top ten worst blizzards to hit the US

Telegraph
" 10. The Cleveland Superbomb, Jan 25-27, 1978 Also known as the Great Blizzard of 1978, this affected large swathes of the US. One to three feet of snowfall was whipped up into 25 foot drifts by 100 mph winds, killing over 70 people.
9. The Superbowl Blizzard of Jan 9-12, 1975 Warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico mixed with colder air from the Rockies, causing devastating snowfalls and over 45 tornadoes in the south west. 70 people were killed.
8. The Blizzard of Jan 2-4, 1999 One of Chicago's worst ever storms, a record 18.6 inches fell in the first day alone. Temperatures fell as low as -30° Celsius. 73 people were killed, with 32 of the deaths resulting from heart attacks brought on by shovelling snow.
2. The Storm of the Century, Mar 11-15, 1993 Also called the White Hurricane, this was a storm of almost unprecedented magnitude. Bringing with it heavy rains, winds and tornadoes, the storm stretched from Canada to Central America. Although many states were affected, the focus was the East Coast and Cuba, with Tennessee receiving 60 inches of snow. Over 300 people were killed."

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